Thursday, March 5, 2015

The Wizard of Id-Brant Parker/Johnny Hart-1970


Although I don't think it's aged all that well, back in 1970 THE WIZARD OF ID was one of my favorite newspaper strips and--along with SMOKEY STOVER and BEETLE BAILEY--a major influence on my own attempts to create a comic strip at 11 years of age. Here are some examples from that year.











Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Malibu-Swing With Scooter-1970

Some nice, clean illustration here, supposedly Bob Oksner and Henry Scarpelli from a Henry Boltinoff script but I'm not really seeing Oksner. Scarpelli, yes. Could be heavy inks on light layouts. Awfully pretty in spots. I love the splash.






Monday, March 2, 2015

The Ogre's Ode-Bats-1961


Orlando Busino perhaps? George Gladir went on at great length about how BATS was essentially panel cartoonist Busino's book and how wonderful he was. Somehow, the fact that they were making FUN of monsters allowed the BATS material to pass the Comics Code. The fact that the Archie's John Goldwater was then the Code's head may also have had something to do with that.


Sunday, March 1, 2015

Captain Flower-Fruitman-1969


Mainstream hippie comics were goofy and fun. In retrospect, they were sort of underground comics without the drugs, sex, nudity, politics, dirty words, and radicalism. Still, it was just a few steps from Captain Flower to Captain Guts! I remember buying this one at Woolworths on a Saturday afternoon back in '69 and reading it at our kitchen table.





Saturday, February 28, 2015

Dan Brand and Tipi-Frank Frazetta-1949


A lot of early Frazetta art from this series was widely reprinted in 1970's fanzines and we all loved it. I still do but I look at it now and I see what seems to be a strong Hogarth influence mixed with some Will Eisner and maybe--even though they were both pretty much contemporaries--some Joe Kubert.







Friday, February 27, 2015

The Secret Files of Dr. Drew-Jerry Grandenetti-1951


Giving credence to the theory that the more familiar DR. DREW stories credited to Grandenetti were, in fact, actually laid out by and/or mostly drawn by his mentor Will Eisner, here's one with less than nothing in common with those either in layout or execution but looking exactly like Jerry's familiar style at other companies later on.








Thursday, February 26, 2015

The Snowman-The Topper-1980


Looking out at all that snow and ice still outside my window, this seems a little too close and creepy!